Where Elvis Presley Stayed

We’re about one week away from the Grand Opening Celebration for the brand new hotel, The Guest House at Graceland. The 450-room resort hotel, located steps away from Graceland, features two restaurants, meeting space, a theater and more – and the hotel is uniquely Elvis, and elegantly rock ‘n’ roll. The Guest House at Graceland is the perfect place to stay if you want to explore everything that Graceland and Memphis has to offer. Elvis, of course, did quite a bit of traveling, whether it was while on tour, filming a movie or making a television appearance. With hotels in mind, let’s take a look at just a few of the hotels Elvis frequented while he was traveling.   Elvis stayed at the Hilton Hawaiian Village several times, most notably around the time he filmed”Blue Hawaii,” which was filmed in the spring of 1961. The hotel’s Carousel Room was home to a press conference with Elvis and comedian Minnie Pearl on Saturday, March 25, 1961. The pair discussed the benefit concert they were set to perform in a few hours at the Bloch Arena. The concert raised money to build a memorial to those killed and injured in the attack on Pearl Harbor. The resort first opened in 1955 and is one of the most prominent resort hotels on Waikiki Beach in Honolulu. The hotel and its famous towers, including the Rainbow Tower, have been renovated many times over the years, with new pools, restaurants and other amenities added to the property. While Elvis was in Hollywood filming his first movie, “Love Me Tender,” he stayed at the Knickerbocker Hotel. Photographer Ed Braslaff takes some photos of Elvis at the hotel on August 18, and later, Elvis and his friends spend $750 at the Long Beach Amusement Park. The Knickerbocker opened in 1929 and was still glamorous when Elvis stayed there. Many celebrities stayed there, including Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio and “I Love Lucy” actor William Frawley.  After falling into disrepair over the years, the building has since been renovated, and it’s now a retirement community called the Hollywood Knickerbocker Apartments.   While Elvis never toured Europe, he did travel there while serving in the United States Army. In the summer of 1959, Elvis was stationed in Germany when he took a 15-day furlough. He traveled to both Munich and Paris with his friends, and in Paris, the guys stayed in a...
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Elvis Presley and the Louisiana Hayride

If you love Elvis Presley today, you can give thanks, in part, to the Louisiana Hayride. The Hayride, a regional radio (and later television) show, helped launch Elvis’ early career. In fact, “The Cradle of the Stars,” as it was known, was the springboard to fame for many country artists such as Hank Williams, Jim Reeves, Slim Whitman, Faron Young, Johnny Cash, Kitty Wells and George Jones, to name a few. The Louisiana Hayride began as a radio program on April 3, 1948, and was broadcast from the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport, Louisiana. Admission for the three-hour show was – get this – 60 cents for adults and 30 cents for children. The show aired in the South, and parts of it aired nationally on CBS Radio and overseas on Armed Forces Radio. Many of the Hayride regulars toured around the region in Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas. Elvis performed on “The Grand Ole Opry” on October 2, 1954, and it was… not exactly the warm reception he’d hoped for. So a week after that performance, his producer, Sam Phillips, booked Elvis on the Opry’s main competition, the Hayride.  Elvis’ first appearance on the Hayride was October 16, 1954. Elvis returned to the Hayride on November 6 with his parents, who had to also sign Elvis’ contract with the show, since Elvis was just 19. Elvis’ pay was $18 per show, and his bandmates, Bill Black and Scotty Moore, would each receive $12 per show. Through the rest of 1954 and 1955, Elvis appeared weekly in Shreveport at the Louisiana Hayride. In October 1955, Elvis’ contract was renewed for $200 per show, as Elvis’ fame had grown in the year since his initial appearance. But that contract wouldn’t last long. In 1956, Elvis released his debut album, appeared on national television and was touring the country. In late 1956, he began filming his first movie. The weekly trips to Shreveport to perform on the Hayride just didn’t fit in with Elvis’ busy schedule, so his new manager, Col. Tom Parker, bought Elvis out of his Hayride contract for $10,000 with a promise that Elvis would perform on the Hayride’s special charity show on December 15, 1956. Elvis’ last regular appearance on the Hayride was March 31, 1956. While the Louisiana Hayride didn’t make Elvis a household name, it did help him reach many new audiences – and of course, that only...
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Elvis Presley in Every Language

Music – especially the music of Elvis Presley – is the universal language. No matter where you go in the world, everyone knows the word “Elvis.” They also know his movies and music, even if English isn’t their first language. And as Elvis fans, we all know the iconic images of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll, including the posters for his movies like “Jailhouse Rock” and “Blue Hawaii.” Those movies had to be marketed to international fans, too – and that’s where we get these amazing international movie posters. These colorful collectors items offer a different look at Elvis movies. Take a look at a few of these cool international movie posters below. This Japanese poster for 1965’s “Girl Happy” is an adorable salute to the movie, complete with the cute beach scene behind Elvis and his co-star, Shelley Fabares. When these movies were marketed internationally, the film titles were translated into many different languages. Many of them are direct translations, but sometimes their meanings are just a little different. Many of the international titles for “Girl Happy” translated to something like, “Girl Crazy” or “Crazy for Girls.” The Japanese poster for “Jailhouse Rock” manages to work in several important scenes from the film, including a fight scene and the famous “Jailhouse Rock” performance. Most of the international titles for “Jailhouse Rock” stayed pretty faithful to the original title. Elvis’ 1968 film “Live a Little, Love a Little,” had similar posters both domestically and internationally. The U.S. poster is vertical and features this main image, in addition to a few others. Here are the Spanish and German posters for “Viva Las Vegas” or, “Love in Las Vegas” and “Great Nights in Las Vegas.” The busy but fun Japanese poster for “It Happened at the World’s Fair” features many scenes from the film. For several international markets, the title was changed to “Blondes, Brunettes and Redheads.” A few other international title changes include “Loving You,” which in Denmark was known as “The Golden Guitar.” “G.I. Blues” was known in many markets as “Cafe Europa.” “Spinout” was changed to “California Holiday” for several international markets. What do you think about these international posters? What’s your favorite Elvis movie? You can see a great collection of Elvis movie posters and movie memorabilia here at Graceland, so if you love Elvis’ films, make sure you plan your Graceland visit...
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